Bubble plumes off Washington, Oregon suggest warmer ocean releases frozen methane

Warming ocean temperatures a third of a mile below the surface, in a dark ocean in areas with little marine life, might attract scant attention. But this is precisely the depth where frozen pockets of methane ‘ice’ transition from a dormant solid to a powerful greenhouse gas.
New University of Washington research, whose lead author is UW professor of oceanography H. 
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Oct 15, 2015 / M9

The Great Shakeout

On October 15, 2015 at 10:15 a.m. PST, people in the northwest and around the world will practice their earthquake safety skills during the Great Shakeout. This event is a great opportunity to practice Drop, Cover, and Hold On and a good reminder on the importance of earthquake preparation.
Prepare for an earthquake

UW Emergency Management: Earthquakes
UW Emergency Management: What NOT to do during an earthquake
UW Emergency Management: Earthquake Awareness & Personal Preparedness (PDF)

  

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Natural Hazards & Resilient Communities: Q&A with journalist Jed Horne

As a journalist, Jed Horne is after the truth. During his time as the city editor at The Times-Picayune in New Orleans, he spent a great deal of time examining the truth in order to tell authentic stories. Before and after Hurricane Katrina arrived at the city’s doorstep, the truth—especially what was conveyed to national and international audiences—was muddled.
Horne set out to set the record straight. 
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Oct 5, 2015 / Geology

Simulating path of ‘magma mush’ inside an active volcano

Months of warning signs from Mauna Loa, on Hawaii’s Big Island, prompted the U.S. Geological Survey to recently start releasing weekly updates on activity at the world’s largest active volcano.
For now, such warning signs can only rely on external clues, like earthquakes and gas emissions. But a University of Washington simulation has managed to demonstrate what’s happening deep inside the volcano. 
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Oct 4, 2015 / Events, Geology, M9

Natural Hazards & Resilient Communities: Q&A with UW’s David Montgomery

UW’s David R. Montgomery, professor of Earth & Space Sciences, knows there’s more to our planet’s surface than what’s at surface level.
The geomorphologist studies the ground beneath our feet; both its propensity to shift and evolve and how those processes might affect ecological systems and human societies past and present.
During the past year, Montgomery and other UW scientists have been developing and analyzing critical data in the aftermath of the 2014 Oso landslide. 
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Sep 17, 2015 / Weather & Climate

Scientists: Let wildfires burn when prudent

With nearly 9 million acres burned this year across the nation, 2015 is shaping up to be one of the most destructive wildfire seasons yet. And with drought and climate change, wildfires are only predicted to get worse. In a commentary published Sept. 17 in Science, a team of scientists, including School of Environmental and Forest Sciences‘ researchers Jerry Franklin and James Agee, describe unique opportunities and provide suggestions to reform forest fire management to reduce the impacts of inevitable wildfires in future years. 
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Sep 15, 2015 / Weather & Climate

Seattle Times lauds UW’s Climate Impacts Group and Arctic studies program

In a piece published by The Seattle Times, the editorial board calls for the United States to get out from behind the curve in addressing emerging challenges and opportunities in the Arctic. They call for comprehensive policies that will position the U.S. to capitalize on the upcoming changes — many of which are already here — and cite the University of Washington’s new Arctic Studies Program and the Climate Impacts Group as leaders in the kind of interdisciplinary thinking and approach it will take to be successful. 
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Climate change could leave Pacific Northwest amphibians high and dry

Far above the wildfires raging in Washington’s forests, a less noticeable consequence of this dry year is taking place in mountain ponds. The minimal snowpack and long summer drought that have left the Pacific Northwest lowlands parched have also affected the region’s amphibians through loss of mountain pond habitat. According to a new paper published Sept. 2 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, this summer’s severe conditions may be the new normal within just a few decades. 
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Surviving Disaster Speaker Series – register now!

The College of the Environment in partnership with The Graduate School and the UW Alumni Association is pleased to present the fall speaker series Surviving Disaster: Natural Hazards & Resilient Communities. Join us for a series of discussions centered around natural disasters — like earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides and hurricanes — and how they can affect the lives and livelihoods of people here in the Pacific Northwest and beyond. 
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Exploring wilderness in one of the lower forty-eight’s most untamed landscapes

What is wilderness?
As we sit at our computers or scroll through on tablets or smart phones, perhaps we picture the opposite of our current locales—mountainous terrain, soaring evergreens, and a variety of critters that depend on each other to maintain balanced ecosystems. Maybe thoughts of flora and fauna, untamed and unexposed to an otherwise modern, industrialized, human-centric world swirl around. 
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