Oceanography consortium donates XPrize winnings to UW sensor lab

A team of industrial, academic, and nonprofit institutions that was among the top finishers of the recent ocean acidification XPrize is donating its winnings to a University of Washington lab that helps track ocean conditions worldwide.
The donation, made Oct. 13 during an event at the UW College of the Environment and announced by Honeywell, will allow the UW and the international Argo program to begin broadening observations to include ocean acidification. 
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Natural Hazards & Resilient Communities: Q&A with UW’s Kate Starbird

From city to city and across continents, barriers to communication are fewer than ever before. In an increasingly connected world, where the 24-hour news cycle reigns and a billion people are on Facebook, people have grown accustomed to instant, accessible information that spans the globe.
Kate Starbird, assistant professor at the UW’s College of Engineering, is exploring a new type of “digital volunteerism” that leverages social media as an online meeting place during crises. 
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Oct 19, 2015 / Weather & Climate

UW study: Will Puget Sound’s population spike under climate change?

What began as mere speculation has started to take a more serious turn. Climate change is now implicated in flooding, droughts, heat waves and other catastrophes that computer models predict will become more common. Suddenly, a region long mocked for its gloomy weather seems like it could be a welcome refuge from a hot, dry future.
A UW graduate student recently took an in-depth look at the issue, which would have implications for the region’s long-term water supplies, transportation and other infrastructure. 
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Bubble plumes off Washington, Oregon suggest warmer ocean releases frozen methane

Warming ocean temperatures a third of a mile below the surface, in a dark ocean in areas with little marine life, might attract scant attention. But this is precisely the depth where frozen pockets of methane ‘ice’ transition from a dormant solid to a powerful greenhouse gas.
New University of Washington research, whose lead author is UW professor of oceanography H. 
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Oct 15, 2015 / M9

The Great Shakeout

On October 15, 2015 at 10:15 a.m. PST, people in the northwest and around the world will practice their earthquake safety skills during the Great Shakeout. This event is a great opportunity to practice Drop, Cover, and Hold On and a good reminder on the importance of earthquake preparation.
Prepare for an earthquake

UW Emergency Management: Earthquakes
UW Emergency Management: What NOT to do during an earthquake
UW Emergency Management: Earthquake Awareness & Personal Preparedness (PDF)

  

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Natural Hazards & Resilient Communities: Q&A with journalist Jed Horne

As a journalist, Jed Horne is after the truth. During his time as the city editor at The Times-Picayune in New Orleans, he spent a great deal of time examining the truth in order to tell authentic stories. Before and after Hurricane Katrina arrived at the city’s doorstep, the truth—especially what was conveyed to national and international audiences—was muddled.
Horne set out to set the record straight. 
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Oct 5, 2015 / Geology

Simulating path of ‘magma mush’ inside an active volcano

Months of warning signs from Mauna Loa, on Hawaii’s Big Island, prompted the U.S. Geological Survey to recently start releasing weekly updates on activity at the world’s largest active volcano.
For now, such warning signs can only rely on external clues, like earthquakes and gas emissions. But a University of Washington simulation has managed to demonstrate what’s happening deep inside the volcano. 
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Oct 4, 2015 / Events, Geology, M9

Natural Hazards & Resilient Communities: Q&A with UW’s David Montgomery

UW’s David R. Montgomery, professor of Earth & Space Sciences, knows there’s more to our planet’s surface than what’s at surface level.
The geomorphologist studies the ground beneath our feet; both its propensity to shift and evolve and how those processes might affect ecological systems and human societies past and present.
During the past year, Montgomery and other UW scientists have been developing and analyzing critical data in the aftermath of the 2014 Oso landslide. 
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Sep 17, 2015 / Weather & Climate

Scientists: Let wildfires burn when prudent

With nearly 9 million acres burned this year across the nation, 2015 is shaping up to be one of the most destructive wildfire seasons yet. And with drought and climate change, wildfires are only predicted to get worse. In a commentary published Sept. 17 in Science, a team of scientists, including School of Environmental and Forest Sciences‘ researchers Jerry Franklin and James Agee, describe unique opportunities and provide suggestions to reform forest fire management to reduce the impacts of inevitable wildfires in future years. 
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Sep 15, 2015 / Weather & Climate

Seattle Times lauds UW’s Climate Impacts Group and Arctic studies program

In a piece published by The Seattle Times, the editorial board calls for the United States to get out from behind the curve in addressing emerging challenges and opportunities in the Arctic. They call for comprehensive policies that will position the U.S. to capitalize on the upcoming changes — many of which are already here — and cite the University of Washington’s new Arctic Studies Program and the Climate Impacts Group as leaders in the kind of interdisciplinary thinking and approach it will take to be successful. 
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