Nov 13, 2016 / Weather & Climate

UW Environment scientists discuss what the current political climate will mean for climate education

Sarah E. Myhre, a postdoctoral scholar with the Future of Ice Initiative and the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington, and Marisa J. Borreggine, an undergraduate in the UW School of Oceanography, discuss what the election of President-elect Donald Trump will mean for their professions, their futures and our planet. Here’s a snippet of their conversation via Medium.com. Follow the link for more. 
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Nov 1, 2016 / Geology

New study looks at what lies below Mount St. Helens

The reason for the location of Mount St. Helens is an enigma. The volcano lies farther west than other peaks in the Cascades volcanic arc. Research published this week may begin to explain why.
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Aug 28, 2016 / Weather & Climate

Interactive map shows where animals will move under climate change

Scientists predict that as Earth warms and climate patterns morph in response, animals will be forced to move to survive. That usually means hightailing it to higher latitudes as equatorial areas become too hot and dry.
The University of Washington and The Nature Conservancy have created an animated map showing where mammals, birds and amphibians are projected to move in the Western Hemisphere in response to climate change. 
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Jul 17, 2016 / Geology

Joseph Wartman, David Montgomery honored for Oso landslide report

Two University of Washington professors are among researchers honored this week by the Geological Society of America for their study of the March 2014 landslide in Oso, Washington.
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Jun 28, 2016 / Geology

UW geologist wins early-career award from American Geophysical Union

Assistant Professor Alison Duvall has received the American Geophysical Union’s early-career award for researchers in the Earth and space sciences!
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Jun 13, 2016 / Weather & Climate

Eastern U.S. needs ‘connectivity’ to help species escape climate change

For plants and animals fleeing the effects of climate change for a better shot at survival, the eastern United States will need to improve “climate connectivity.”
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Jun 13, 2016 / Geology

Arc volcano releases mix of material from Earth’s mantle and crust

New research from Earth and Space Sciences’ Fang-Zhen Teng shows that a common type of volcano isn’t just spewing molten rock from the mantle, but contains elements suggesting something more complicated is drawing material out of the Earth’s crust.
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Will more snow over Antarctica offset rising seas? Don’t count on it

A new study out of Earth and Space Sciences finds that warmer temperatures don’t necessarily equal more snowfall in Antarctica after all.
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Scientists recommend immediate plan to combat changes to West Coast seawater chemistry

Global carbon dioxide emissions are triggering troubling changes to ocean chemistry along the West Coast that require immediate, decisive actions to combat through a coordinated regional approach, a panel of scientific experts has unanimously concluded.
A failure to adequately respond to this fundamental change in seawater chemistry, known as ocean acidification, is anticipated to have devastating ecological consequences for the West Coast in the decades to come, the 20-member West Coast Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia (OAH) Science Panel warned in a comprehensive report unveiled April 4. 
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Mar 31, 2016 / M9

The Interface between Natural Hazards and People

Associate Professor and M9 Project investigator, Joe Wartman, recently published an op-ed on the interface between natural hazards and people. The opinion article, titled “What we’ve learned from the deadly Oso, Washington landslide two years on”, can be accessed here. 

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