49 posts in Weather & Climate

Dec 12, 2016 / Weather & Climate

Mountain glaciers are showing some of the strongest responses to climate change

A new study analyzing 37 glaciers around the world shows that because of their decades-long response times, glaciers are among the purest signals of human-driven climate change.
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Nov 16, 2016 / Weather & Climate

UW Program on Climate Change Director LuAnne Thompson on being a climate scientist

The College of the Environment’s LuAnne Thompson, a faculty member in the School of Oceanography and the director of the Program on Climate Change, has dedicated her career to researching the ocean’s role in climate variability. Having recently returned from France, where she delved into the specifics of measuring an interpreting sea levels from radar altimetry with her academic peers, Thompson reflects on her feelings about the state of climate science and her hopes for the future of climate science outreach and education. 
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Nov 13, 2016 / Weather & Climate

UW Environment scientists discuss what the current political climate will mean for climate education

Sarah E. Myhre, a postdoctoral scholar with the Future of Ice Initiative and the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington, and Marisa J. Borreggine, an undergraduate in the UW School of Oceanography, discuss what the election of President-elect Donald Trump will mean for their professions, their futures and our planet. Here’s a snippet of their conversation via Medium.com. Follow the link for more. 
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Aug 28, 2016 / Weather & Climate

Interactive map shows where animals will move under climate change

Scientists predict that as Earth warms and climate patterns morph in response, animals will be forced to move to survive. That usually means hightailing it to higher latitudes as equatorial areas become too hot and dry.
The University of Washington and The Nature Conservancy have created an animated map showing where mammals, birds and amphibians are projected to move in the Western Hemisphere in response to climate change. 
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Jun 13, 2016 / Weather & Climate

Eastern U.S. needs ‘connectivity’ to help species escape climate change

For plants and animals fleeing the effects of climate change for a better shot at survival, the eastern United States will need to improve “climate connectivity.”
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Will more snow over Antarctica offset rising seas? Don’t count on it

A new study out of Earth and Space Sciences finds that warmer temperatures don’t necessarily equal more snowfall in Antarctica after all.
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Scientists recommend immediate plan to combat changes to West Coast seawater chemistry

Global carbon dioxide emissions are triggering troubling changes to ocean chemistry along the West Coast that require immediate, decisive actions to combat through a coordinated regional approach, a panel of scientific experts has unanimously concluded.
A failure to adequately respond to this fundamental change in seawater chemistry, known as ocean acidification, is anticipated to have devastating ecological consequences for the West Coast in the decades to come, the 20-member West Coast Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia (OAH) Science Panel warned in a comprehensive report unveiled April 4. 
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Mar 15, 2016 / Weather & Climate

New technique tracks ‘heartbeat’ of hundreds of wetlands

Researchers from the College of the Environment recently developed a new, innovative approach to better understand the hydrology of Eastern Washington’s wetlands. Their data will inform us about how these wetlands behalf seasonally and how they change as the climate warms.
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NOAA funds Washington Sea Grant to help communities protect their coasts

Washington SeaGrant was recently awarded nearly $900,000 by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to help coastal communities protect against hazards, including tsunamis, winter storms and sea-level rise.
The three-year project will help prepare Washington’s roughly 3,100 miles of coastline and more than 45 coastal cities for current and future hazards. The award is one of six NOAA Regional Coastal Resilience Grants awarded this year. 
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Feb 22, 2016 / Weather & Climate

UW part of team that drilled first deep ice core at the South Pole

This January — high summer at the South Pole — a University of Washington glaciologist helped lead a project that surpassed its goal to drill the first deep ice core at the planet’s southernmost tip, providing material to help solve a climate puzzle.
Eric Steig, a UW professor of Earth and space sciences, returned to Seattle this month after being chief scientist for the final stretch of the National Science Foundation-funded effort at the Antarctic station. 
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