Jun 2, 2018 / M9

Coastal Hazards Resilience Network Annual Meeting

Connect and learn about hazards and resilience projects happening along Washington’s coast at the next Coastal Hazards Resilience Network (CHRN) Annual Meeting. The event will take place on June 5, 2018 from 9:00AM-4:00PM at University of Washington, South Campus Center (Room 303).
 

9:00 AM – 9:25 AM
Welcome

9:25 AM – 9:30 AM
Break

9:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Earthquake and Tsunami Session

Carrie Garrison-Laney of Washington Sea Grant: Introduction to earthquake hazards in WA and how paleoseismology is used to determine recurrence of earthquakes and tsunamis
Randall LeVeque of UW: Introduction to tsunami modeling
Daniel Eungard of the Washington Department of Natural Resources: Introduction to Washington’s tsunami maps and explanation for L1
Dan Abramson of UW: Tsunami hazard scenarios in community planning in Aberdeen and Neah Bay
Ann Bostrom of UW: Communicating information about hazards

12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Lunch

Food is available for purchase at the Rotunda, Vista Cafe, and Aqua Verde. 

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Jan 17, 2018 / Weather & Climate

Civil War-era U.S. Navy ships’ logs to be explored for climate data, maritime history

A new grant will let a University of Washington-based project add a new fleet to its quest to learn more about past climate from the records of long-gone mariners. The UW is among the winners of the 2017 “Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives” awards, announced Jan. 4 by the Washington, D.C.-based Council on Library and Information Resources.
The new $482,018 grant to the UW, the U.S. 
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Dec 11, 2017 / Weather & Climate

Q&A: UW’s Shuyi Chen on hurricane science, forecasting and the 2017 hurricane season

The United States just suffered the most intense hurricane season in more than a decade, and possibly the costliest ever. Hurricane Harvey hit Houston in mid-August. Hurricane Irma struck Florida in early September, followed just two weeks later by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and the Caribbean.
Now, with the close of hurricane season on Nov. 30, new UW faculty member Shuyi Chen, professor in the UW’s Department of Atmospheric Sciences and an expert on hurricanes, answered a few questions about the state of hurricane forecasting and the 2017 storm season. 
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Nov 27, 2017 / Geology

Less life: Limited phosphorus recycling suppressed early Earth’s biosphere

The amount of biomass — life — in Earth’s ancient oceans may have been limited due to low recycling of the key nutrient phosphorus, according to new research by the University of Washington and the University of St. Andrews in Scotland.
The research, published online Nov. 22 in the journal Science Advances, also comments on the role of volcanism in supporting Earth’s early biosphere — and may even apply to the search for life on other worlds.  
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Oct 22, 2017 / Geology, M9

50 simulations show how a 9.0 Cascadia earthquake could play out

We know the “really big one” is coming. But what exactly is going to happen in cities along the coast?
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Sep 20, 2017 / Geology, M9

Hacking a pressure sensor to track gradual motion along marine faults

Deep below the ocean’s surface, shielded from satellite signals, the gradual movement of the seafloor — including along faults that can unleash deadly earthquakes and tsunamis — goes largely undetected. As a result, we know distressingly little about motion along the fault that lies just off the Pacific Northwest coast.
University of Washington oceanographers are working with a local company to develop a simple new technique that could track seafloor movement in earthquake-prone coastal areas. 
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Sep 10, 2017 / Weather & Climate

Ship exhaust makes oceanic thunderstorms more intense

Thunderstorms directly above two of the world’s busiest shipping lanes are significantly more powerful than storms in areas of the ocean where ships don’t travel, according to new research.
A new study mapping lightning around the globe finds lightning strokes occur nearly twice as often directly above heavily-trafficked shipping lanes in the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea than they do in areas of the ocean adjacent to shipping lanes that have similar climates. 
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Sep 10, 2017 / Geology, M9

Land-sea experiment will track earthquakes, volcanoes along Alaska Peninsula

The National Science Foundation is funding the largest marine seismic-monitoring effort yet along the Alaska Peninsula, a region with frequent and diverse earthquake and volcanic activity. Involving aircraft and ships, the new Alaska Amphibious Community Seismic Experiment will be led by Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, with partners at the University of Washington and seven other research institutions.
“This effort will really change the information we have at our disposal for understanding the seismic properties of subduction zones,” said Emily Roland, a UW assistant professor of oceanography and one of nine principal investigators on the project. 
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Aug 31, 2017 / Weather & Climate

Q&A: How Idaho, Montana, North Dakota and Yellowstone National Park are confronting climate change

The Northern Rocky Mountain ecosystem includes huge swaths of federal lands, two national parks and some of the most spectacular wild spaces in the country. University of Washington researchers are helping managers of those lands prepare for a shifting climate.
“Climate Change and Rocky Mountain Ecosystems,” a book published in August, was edited by Jessica Halofsky, a UW research ecologist in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, and David Peterson, a senior research biologist with the U.S. 
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Aug 31, 2017 / Weather & Climate

Record-low 2016 Antarctic sea ice due to ‘perfect storm’ of tropical, polar conditions

While winter sea ice in the Arctic is declining so dramatically that ships can now navigate those waters without any icebreaker escort, the scene in the Southern Hemisphere is much different. Sea ice around Antarctica has actually increased slightly during winter — until last year.
About a year ago, a dramatic drop in Antarctic sea ice during spring in the Southern Hemisphere brought its maximum area to its lowest level in 40 years of record keeping. 
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