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Together we will

Understand and mitigate the devastating impacts of natural hazards

About Us

In a changing world, it is important to understand the natural hazards that originate all around us. A cross-disciplinary effort from the University of Washington, UW College of the Environment, and other university partners is shifting the conversation around these hazards. With state and federal agencies, our scientists and researchers are undaunted in their passion for understanding how and why these hazards occur and how we can take meaningful steps to mitigate. Natural Hazards at the University of Washington is a boundless body of experts working toward a more resilient future for communities across the globe.

Building destroyed by earthquake

Featured Project: M9

M9 is reducing the catastrophic potential of Cascadia quakes before they happen.

UW seismologist John Vidale elected to National Academy of Sciences

John E. Vidale, a University of Washington professor of Earth and space sciences, is among 84 new members and 21 foreign associates elected this week as members of the National Academy of Sciences. Academy members are recognized for their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research, according to a news release from the academy.
Vidale studies Earth’s interior, including earthquakes and volcanoes. 

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Researchers find more efficient way to make oil from dead trees

The mountain pine beetle has destroyed more than 40 million acres of forest in the western United States — an area roughly the size of Washington state.
The beetles introduce a fungus that prevents water and critical nutrients from traveling within a tree. They also lay eggs under the conifers’ bark, and their feeding larvae help kill trees — sometimes just weeks after the initial attack. 

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Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, USGS and partners launch West Coast earthquake early warning system

The U.S. Geological Survey and university, public and private partners held an event April 10 at the University of Washington to introduce the ShakeAlert earthquake early warning program as a unified, West Coast-wide system. The event also introduced the first pilot uses of the earthquake early warning in Washington and Oregon.
The first Pacific Northwest pilot users of the system are Bothell, Wash.-based RH2 Engineering, which will use the alerts to secure municipal water and sewer systems so these structures remain usable after a major quake. 

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