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Together we will

Understand and mitigate the devastating impacts of natural hazards

About Us

In a changing world, it is important to understand the natural hazards that originate all around us. A cross-disciplinary effort from the University of Washington, UW College of the Environment, and other university partners is shifting the conversation around these hazards. With state and federal agencies, our scientists and researchers are undaunted in their passion for understanding how and why these hazards occur and how we can take meaningful steps to mitigate. Natural Hazards at the University of Washington is a boundless body of experts working toward a more resilient future for communities across the globe.

Building destroyed by earthquake

Featured Project: M9

M9 is reducing the catastrophic potential of Cascadia quakes before they happen.

Distant earthquakes can cause underwater landslides

New research finds that large earthquakes can trigger underwater landslides thousands of miles away, weeks or months after the quake occurs.
Researchers analyzing data from ocean-bottom seismometers off the Washington-Oregon coast tied a series of underwater landslides on the Cascadia Subduction Zone to a 2012 magnitude-8.6 earthquake in the Indian Ocean — more than 8,000 miles away. These underwater landslides occurred intermittently for nearly four months after the April earthquake. 

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Nature spotlights UW geophysicists’ fight to save lives with seafloor sensors

Inventor and entrepreneur Jerry Paros and University of Washington scientists are monitoring undersea faults for movements and signs of the next catastrophic earthquake. A recent Nature article looks at Paros, who has donated $2 million to the UW, and the collaborative project he’s working on with researchers including the School of Oceanography’s Emily Roland and William Wilcock. Over the course of his career, Paros developed an ultra-precise quartz sensor for oil, gas and other industry applications. 

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UW seismologist John Vidale elected to National Academy of Sciences

John E. Vidale, a University of Washington professor of Earth and space sciences, is among 84 new members and 21 foreign associates elected this week as members of the National Academy of Sciences. Academy members are recognized for their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research, according to a news release from the academy.
Vidale studies Earth’s interior, including earthquakes and volcanoes. 

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