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Together we will

Understand and mitigate the devastating impacts of natural hazards

About Us

In a changing world, it is important to understand the natural hazards that originate all around us. A cross-disciplinary effort from the University of Washington, UW College of the Environment, and other university partners is shifting the conversation around these hazards. With state and federal agencies, our scientists and researchers are undaunted in their passion for understanding how and why these hazards occur and how we can take meaningful steps to mitigate. Natural Hazards at the University of Washington is a boundless body of experts working toward a more resilient future for communities across the globe.

Building destroyed by earthquake

Featured Project: M9

M9 is reducing the catastrophic potential of Cascadia quakes before they happen.

Ship exhaust makes oceanic thunderstorms more intense

Thunderstorms directly above two of the world’s busiest shipping lanes are significantly more powerful than storms in areas of the ocean where ships don’t travel, according to new research.
A new study mapping lightning around the globe finds lightning strokes occur nearly twice as often directly above heavily-trafficked shipping lanes in the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea than they do in areas of the ocean adjacent to shipping lanes that have similar climates. 

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Land-sea experiment will track earthquakes, volcanoes along Alaska Peninsula

The National Science Foundation is funding the largest marine seismic-monitoring effort yet along the Alaska Peninsula, a region with frequent and diverse earthquake and volcanic activity. Involving aircraft and ships, the new Alaska Amphibious Community Seismic Experiment will be led by Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, with partners at the University of Washington and seven other research institutions.
“This effort will really change the information we have at our disposal for understanding the seismic properties of subduction zones,” said Emily Roland, a UW assistant professor of oceanography and one of nine principal investigators on the project. 

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Q&A: How Idaho, Montana, North Dakota and Yellowstone National Park are confronting climate change

The Northern Rocky Mountain ecosystem includes huge swaths of federal lands, two national parks and some of the most spectacular wild spaces in the country. University of Washington researchers are helping managers of those lands prepare for a shifting climate.
“Climate Change and Rocky Mountain Ecosystems,” a book published in August, was edited by Jessica Halofsky, a UW research ecologist in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, and David Peterson, a senior research biologist with the U.S. 

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