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Together we will

Understand and mitigate the devastating impacts of natural hazards

About Us

In a changing world, it is important to understand the natural hazards that originate all around us. A cross-disciplinary effort from the University of Washington, UW College of the Environment, and other university partners is shifting the conversation around these hazards. With state and federal agencies, our scientists and researchers are undaunted in their passion for understanding how and why these hazards occur and how we can take meaningful steps to mitigate. Natural Hazards at the University of Washington is a boundless body of experts working toward a more resilient future for communities across the globe.

Building destroyed by earthquake

Featured Project: M9

M9 is reducing the catastrophic potential of Cascadia quakes before they happen.

Coastal Hazards Resilience Network Annual Meeting

Connect and learn about hazards and resilience projects happening along Washington’s coast at the next Coastal Hazards Resilience Network (CHRN) Annual Meeting. The event will take place on June 5, 2018 from 9:00AM-4:00PM at University of Washington, South Campus Center (Room 303). 

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Civil War-era U.S. Navy ships’ logs to be explored for climate data, maritime history

A new grant will let a University of Washington-based project add a new fleet to its quest to learn more about past climate from the records of long-gone mariners. The UW is among the winners of the 2017 “Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives” awards, announced Jan. 4 by the Washington, D.C.-based Council on Library and Information Resources.
The new $482,018 grant to the UW, the U.S. 

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Q&A: UW’s Shuyi Chen on hurricane science, forecasting and the 2017 hurricane season

The United States just suffered the most intense hurricane season in more than a decade, and possibly the costliest ever. Hurricane Harvey hit Houston in mid-August. Hurricane Irma struck Florida in early September, followed just two weeks later by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and the Caribbean.
Now, with the close of hurricane season on Nov. 30, new UW faculty member Shuyi Chen, professor in the UW’s Department of Atmospheric Sciences and an expert on hurricanes, answered a few questions about the state of hurricane forecasting and the 2017 storm season. 

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